Category: Historical Fiction

Center-punched Sideways Again!

How do I keep getting knocked so far off track that I’m not even sure I’m still on the same internet as my readers? By now, I’m sure my readers recognize the signs and the pattern. Yep, when I step away and get quiet, it means that I’m questioning (again?!) my purpose, mission, goals, and […]


What Do You Write On? (Or: The Joys of Journals!)

For many, many years, I wrote everything on lined, 3-hole punched notebook paper. After all, that is what teachers require, right? The REALLY picky ones ban all paper with messy, spiral-bound edges too! I wrote everything for work and school in blue or black ink because, again, that was required. But somewhere along the way, […]


Mission Stories: An Update

This will be a very short post. Because, frankly, there isn’t much to say. 🙁  Ihave begun the research of the missions in So. Cal. as those are the ones we are planning to visit and write stories for first. My parents are camping in Oceanside for the next month, and there just happens to […]


Shifting Paradigms = New Stories to Tell

A little background first: sitting in church the day after my daughter’s first karate class, I had a vision of a grand battle. The characters who introduced themselves to me were an elite mother/daughter team of warriors. Who were these women? Who or what were they fighting? Why? Because of the setting I was in […]


World-building for Readers

Science fiction and fantasy writers live in worlds of their own creation for every story. They are expected to create other-worldly rules, creatures, elements, and characters. Magic and charms are common. What about writers of other genres? Each story, regardless of genre, contains a unique world of its own. Writers use a variety of techniques […]


Historical Fiction: Fact or Stereotype

One of the things that makes historical research the most difficult is the unreliability and bias that is inherent in any source. As a writer, I strive to be historically accurate. When it comes to details like what tools were made out of, or what kind of hat was worn, or even the weather in […]