Posts tagged Joanna Branson

Shifting Paradigms = New Stories to Tell

A little background first: sitting in church the day after my daughter’s first karate class, I had a vision of a grand battle. The characters who introduced themselves to me were an elite mother/daughter team of warriors. Who were these women? Who or what were they fighting? Why? Because of the setting I was in […]


The Novel Implied

“Look closely at your book and make sure that you want to see the novel it implies.”   ~Walter Mosley, This Year You Write Your Novel I take this quote a step further. When I look at my book ideas, I make sure that I want to read the novel that is implied. I have […]


Focus on Good Writing

Well, I’m back after a bit of a hectic hiatus. I don’t know if that’s an oxymoron, or perfectly normal but no, it was not a vacation! After much soul-searching, I’ve had to admit that I don’t want to blog about academic writing. While teaching is… alright… and I have some incredibly fun students in […]


My Foray Into Tech Writing

A few weeks ago, a generous client of mine, one for whom I have done some ghostwriting and copywriting, offered me a technical writing assignment. She is creating, generating, and revising hundreds of documents which are required for her company’s ISO certification. I agreed to try my hand at the technical writing and eagerly dug […]


Clues to Identifying Exposition Styles

Many styles of expository writing sound the same. Some even have the same, or overlapping, purposes. So how can you tell the difference between them? One of the easiest ways to differentiate the styles is to look for telltale transition words that are specific to a particular style. Check out the most easily identified transitions […]


Do You Trust Me?

By now, you’re probably wondering who I am and why I’m so critical of the college system that provides my primary income. It’s not wise to “bite the hand that feeds you,” right? Yeah. Well, I’ve never been especially good at following the rules or living by platitudes, wise as they might be. (So how’s […]


Historical Fiction: Fact or Stereotype

One of the things that makes historical research the most difficult is the unreliability and bias that is inherent in any source. As a writer, I strive to be historically accurate. When it comes to details like what tools were made out of, or what kind of hat was worn, or even the weather in […]


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